Keeping Sculpture Light

Does sculpture have to be heavy? Randy Klein believes sculpture can be light. Even the large scale public works allow the sky to penetrate. A narrative flows through all the work, adding a story to the physicality of the work. Most recently, in the story told in 120 sculptures in the touring exhibition, Moment to Moment.
‘Randy Klein seems to think in sculptural terms as easily and directly as the bird sings’ – John Russell Taylor, The Times
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Latest News

Immortals – upcoming exhibition at GX Gallery, 1-19 September 2015. Private view Wednesday, 3 September. GX Gallery
Sculpture’s Place in the Public Space – Public sculpture walk and panel discussion with Museum of Walking, 16 September 2015
A rare opportunity to visit the artist’s studio during the Nunhead Art Trail, 19-20 September
Installation and Book Launch at the bookartbookshop, from 4 October 2015

Art and Transcendence

Begin from zero. From nothing. Like a field with fresh snow where no one has walked and you take the first steps. And this is the beginning of a new life.

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The Inferno and the Supermarket

…which brings me back to thinking about the Divine Comedy of Dante. In Dante’s time, like our own, there were corrupt politicians and greedy bankers too. But he had a solution for this – to send them into the bowels of hell.

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Coney Island Artist

“Always carry a sketchbook with you”.
“Waiting for inspiration to strike is OK. Just make sure there’s a brush in your hand and you’re standing I front of a canvas when inspiration strikes”. – Robert Henri

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An Artist with Letters

Rarely rarely comest thou, O Spirit of Delight – and believes in livening us up rather than dragging us down. Philosophy of letter forms or not, it matters little.

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Randy Klein sculpture

Keeping Sculpture Light

I felt that massive great sculptures had much less sense of space than the illusion of space in a painting. And they even change very little as you walk around them.

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Taking Art to the Movies

Classics of the MGM Technicolor school include the greatest (and worst) films about an artist ever made, “Lust for Life”, based on Irving Stone’s adaptation of the Van Gogh letters.

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